Guess Again!

Guess Again!

This surprising book delighted my kids and had them giggling the whole way through. On each page their is a rhyming passage with the last word left out. The lines read like a clue and the illustrations show a grayed out shadow with the outline of the character the child is supposed to guess. However when you turn the page, the character and the illustration are entirely unexpected. All of my kid wanted to look at this book again on their own after I was done reading it to them.

Guess Again by Mac Barnett

Guess Again! Details

Title: Guess Again!
Author: Mac Barnett
Illustrator: Adam Rex
Publication Year: 2009
Website: www.macbarnett.com
Age Group: Preschool, Kindergarten, Early Elementary
Amazon Product Page (Affiliate Link)

Comments

You have to actually hold this book in your hands to appreciate how funny it is. For example, the first page is a little poem that clearly points to the missing word at the end being “bunny.” The images shows a carrot patch with the a black outline of what obviously appears to be a rabbit. However, when you turn the page, it just says “Grandpa Ned” and shows a picture of a man standing on his hand with his socks hanging down from his feet like rabbit ears.

The entire book is like this. My kids could not wait for me to turn each page and reveal the hilarious, non-sensical answer. The book also has occasional interesting features in it. One of the pages has a flap to reveal the answer. One of the pages has a cutaway that lets you peer through a mousehole to try to see the answer. While that page clearly directs you to an answer of mouse, when you turn the page, the answer is Viking. The Viking’s furry toe does bear a resemblance to a mouse.

All in all, this book is delightful in the most literal sense of the word. My kids were filled with delight, their eyes sparkling an anticipation, as we turned the pages of this book.

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